sights & sounds

May 18, 2010

Nun excommunicated for saving patient’s life.

Filed under: Uncategorized — Jay @ 9:11 pm
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Bishop Thomas J. Olmsted

From AZCentral:

A Catholic nun and longtime administrator of St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center in Phoenix was reassigned in the wake of a decision to allow a pregnancy to be ended in order to save the life of a critically ill patient.

The decision also drew a sharp rebuke from Bishop Thomas J. Olmsted, head of the Phoenix Diocese, who indicated the woman was “automatically excommunicated” because of the action. (more…)

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April 30, 2010

Arizona boycott?

Filed under: Uncategorized — Jay @ 2:49 am
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From the NY Times:

A spreading call for an economic boycott of Arizona after its adoption of a tough immigration law that opponents consider racially discriminatory worried business leaders on Monday and angered the governor.

Several immigrant advocates and civil rights groups, joined by members of the San Francisco government, said the state should pay economic consequences for the new law, which gives the police broad power to detain people they reasonably suspect are illegal immigrants and arrest them on state charges if they do not have legal status.

La Opinión, the nation’s largest Spanish-language newspaper, urged a boycott in an editorial Monday, as did the Rev. Al Sharpton, and calls for such action spread to social media sites. The San Francisco city attorney and members of the Board of Supervisors said they would propose that the city not do business with the state.

This state boycott would be pretty misdirected1, in my opinion; and I’m deeply skeptical of just how effective it would be, anyway.

1. Boycotting an entire region (including the Hispanic population that the boycotters are concerned for) for the actions of a few higher-ups makes little sense.

April 25, 2010

of police states and imaginary borderlines

From the NY Times; emphasis mine.:

Gov. Jan Brewer of Arizona signed the nation’s toughest bill on illegal immigration into law on Friday. Its aim is to identify, prosecute and deport illegal immigrants.

The law, which proponents and critics alike said was the broadest and strictest immigration measure in generations, would make the failure to carry immigration documents a crime and give the police broad power to detain anyone suspected of being in the country illegally. Opponents have called it an open invitation for harassment and discrimination against Hispanics regardless of their citizenship status.

[Governor Jan Brewer] acknowledged critics’ concerns, saying she would work to ensure that the police have proper training to carry out the law. But she sided with arguments by the law’s sponsors that it provides an indispensable tool for the police in a border state that is a leading magnet of illegal immigration. She said racial profiling would not be tolerated, adding, “We have to trust our law enforcement.”

…..

“We have to trust our law enforcement”? (more…)

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